Tag: Documentary

Nev Schulman – In Real Life | Review

Title: In Real Life

Author: Nev Schulman

Type: Non-Fiction

Page Count/Review Word Count: 246

Rating 3.5/5

 

 

If you’ve ever watched MTV’s Catfish then you’ve already heard of Schulman. He’s the guy who presents the show, and in fact he earlier presented a documentary of the same name about his own experience as a victim of catfishing. Oh, and catfishing, for those of you who aren’t in the know, is when people pretend to be someone they’re not on a social networking site.

What was quite cool about this is that you get to know Schulman some more as a person, and it turns out that he wasn’t always the greatest of guys. In fact, it almost feels as though he wrote this book to come to terms with the person he was as a youth, when he got into fights, sold weed and magic mushrooms and was a bit of a womaniser.

But at the same time as telling his own story, Schulman also shares practical advice that’s designed to help other people to stay safe on social networking sites, and that makes it a little similar to one of my own books, Social Paranoia. He did it well though, and even though the book is a couple of years old by now, I think it’s held up well to the passage of time. I’d recommend it to fans of the show, but probably not to general readers. Yeah.

 

 

Click here to buy In Real Life.

 


David Attenborough – Life On Earth | Review

Title: Life On Earth

Author: David Attenborough

Type: Non-Fiction

Page Count/Review Word Count: 324

Rating: 4*/5

 

David Attenborough - Life On Earth

David Attenborough – Life On Earth

 

If you’re familiar with the work of David Attenborough then you know roughly what to expect here. This is basically the great naturalist’s narrative on how life on earth came about, and it’s thoroughly fascinating if you’re interested in animals – although also occasionally intimidating as well.

My copy of it is maybe forty years old, but it’s still pretty interesting and it’s all up-to-date in most areas – except for where Attenborough said there were four billion humans on the planet. It also comes with plenty of high quality imagery because he wrote the book at the same time as filming the documentary series of the same name, so he’s able to tap into the footage from the show and from other wildlife photographers. Sometimes they take up both pages of a two-page spread, which means they’re shown in fantastic quality – and that it’s easier to whizz through pages than you might first imagine.

I think the most interesting aspect of this book is actually the little things that you learn about different animals, although I find it hard to think of a specific example. But it’s cool when he tells you about the animal with the largest eyes in relation to the rest of its body (I think it was a lemur at 250 times larger in proportion than human eyes) and then you turn the page and see a photo of it.

All in all then, this book definitely isn’t for everyone – and in fact, I suspect it’s meant as more of a coffee table book than as one that you’d pick up and read from cover to cover. Nevertheless, that’s what I did and I enjoyed it, and so if you’re an animal lover or you think that biology is just fascinating, you’re going to like it. If not, you still might.

 

David Attenborough

David Attenborough

 

Click here to buy Life On Earth.

 


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